Writing A Book? Here’s Why You Might Want To Shorten That Manuscript

If you’re like most writers, you enjoyed writing when you were in school.  Your teacher asked for a page, you wrote two or three.  Writing was probably your favorite subject, or at least very high on the list of things you liked about school.  And, since you like to write so much, writing a book manuscript probably comes naturally to you.  But, you might want to rethink that lengthy manuscript and create a booklet instead.

Let’s take a look at why you should even desire to write a booklet in the first place, as opposed to writing a full length book.

The Purpose Of A Booklet

A booklet is a not meant to give every detail of information available about a particular subject.  The purpose of a booklet is to give the facts or an introduction to a subject, or to give a small amount of relevant information.  A booklet is not a book, and it doesn’t compete with books in the market place.

What makes booklets so attractive to the public is that they are a fast read.  Most people won’t make the time to sit down and read a full length book.  They want fast information that they can understand immediately.  Booklets provide this.

The Benefits Of Booklets

For you, the author, there are several benefits to writing booklets.  The first is that they are short and easy to write.  And this benefit leads to the next one – you can get your work on the market quickly and start earning money right away.

Another benefit of writing booklets is that you can actually make more money with them than you can with a full length book.  When you have a full length book that consists of 10 chapters, your book may sell for $15.00 – $20.00.  But, if you take each of those chapters and turn them into a booklet and sell them for just $5.00 each, you now have a series of booklets that sell for a total of $50.00.  It’s the same material, it’s just packaged differently.

With benefits like these, you can see why writing less, or writing less in one publication, is better.  You can become an author, make money (and more of it) much faster with a booklet than you could with a full length book.

How To Stay Focused And Keep Your Writing Concise

Now that you know the purpose of writing a booklet and the benefits you will receive for doing so, it’s time to look at your writing.  If you like writing lengthy manuscripts, you’ll need to readjust your thinking a little.  Here are four simple tips to help you.

1)  Realize that you don’t need to include every last detail in your booklet.  You only need to include the most important ones.  You can always write a second booklet to give more information.

2) Focus on one major point and stick to it.  For example, instead of general horse care, focus on just one aspect of it such as choosing the right horse, or horse grooming.

3) Know who you are writing to and write to them.  Make sure you are writing what your audience wants to read, giving them the information they desire.  Leave out the fluff.

4) Proofread and edit your work for clarity and brevity.  Cut out anything that is unnecessary.  Make all of your words count.

There’s nothing wrong with writing a book, and in fact book authors should be commended for their efforts.  Writing a book is usually a long, tedious, drawn out process.  But, if your goal is to make money fast with your writing, a booklet is the way to do it.

To your riches,

Kim

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